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How to Skip the Sciatica Surgery

spinal stenosis

How do you really know when it is your time? Is it something you should do? Is there any other way to end your horrible low back pain? These are all pretty standard questions when it comes to the dreaded ‘s’ word.

The decision to have sciatica nerve surgery is a big one. It does not matter if you are being told that it is minimally invasive or not, it is still invasive…and it is still surgery. If you are being told that it might be your time to go under the knife, here are some questions you should ask yourself.

What to Ask Yourself Before Considering Sciatica Nerve Surgery:

1 – Do you know the reason you have sciatica?- do you know if you your pain is because of a slipped disc, degenerative disc disease, piriformis syndrome, spinal stenosis, etc.? Whatever is causing your pain affects how you need to fix your pain. If your doctor has never looked into the cause of your pain, there is a good chance that you are not getting the right treatment. Before you do anything crucial, be sure that the medical options that you have tried should be able to help your low back pain without further hurting your spine. It is always a good idea to talk to a second doctor about this as well.

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2 – Have you been in constant pain for at least 3 months? – if you are looking for a sciatic treatment, then you are no stranger to pain. If you are able to find relief with medications, therapy, massage, etc., then you should stick with that and not go the surgery route. A good doctor will not even recommend surgery unless your pain is due to a trauma or you have been in constant, never ending pain for at least three months with no way of finding relief.

3 – Have you tried all of the natural remedies – have you just been taking pills and injections for your treatment? There are many natural ways to find relief. If you have not looked into spinal decompression, physical therapy, massage, eating habits, and exercise, you should. You want to make sure that surgery is an absolute last resort.

The biggest thing for you to remember when thinking about this is that your pain may come back. Many people are pain free for months, even years, but at some point they find themselves back in pain. What is worse, most people do not know that if your pain returns after a surgery, odds are the only way for you to find relief would be another surgery.

Until you find a Cure, your pain Will Always Return.

Are You Ready to End Your Sciatica Pain?

Learn Easy Tips to Avoid Sciatic Surgery and Find Relief Today.

Be Pain Free By Next Week athttp://www.treat-sciatic-nerve-pain.info

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Bone Spurs – Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Bone spur is a term used to describe a condition that characterizes the growth of an extra bone on the normal bone. In medical terms, it is known as osteophytes. Bone spur usually takes place on the joints of the spine, feet, shoulders, hips, hands and knees. It is not painful but sometimes causes pain when it rubs against other bones around it. It is more common among people above 60 years of age. It is associated with spine degeneration.


Causes of Bone Spurs


As osteoarthritis breaks down the cartilage in your joint, your body attempts to repair the loss. Often this means creating new areas of bone along the edges of your existing bones. Your body may also create bone spurs to add stability to aging joints. Bone spurs are the hallmark of other diseases and conditions, including:


Spondylosis. In this condition, osteoarthritis and bone spurs cause degeneration of the bones in your neck (cervical spondylosis) or your lower back (lumbar spondylosis).


Spinal stenosis. Bone spurs can contribute to a narrowing of the bones that make up your spine (spinal stenosis), putting pressure on your spinal cord.

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Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). This condition causes bony growths to form on the ligaments of your spine.


Plantar fasciitis. A bone spur, sometimes called a heel spur, can form where the connective tissue (fascia) connects to your heel bone (calcaneus). The spur results from chronic irritation or inflammation of the connective tissue, but the spur itself doesn’t cause the pain associated with plantar fasciitis.


Signs and symptoms


On your spine, bone spurs can push against your nerves, or even your spinal cord, causing pain and numbness elsewhere in your body.


On your neck, cervical bone spurs can protrude inward, occasionally making it difficult to swallow or painful to breathe. Bone spurs can also push against veins, restricting blood flow to your brain.


In your shoulder, bone spurs can restrict the range of motion of your arm. Bone spurs can rub on your rotator cuff, a group of tendons that help control your shoulder movements. This can cause swelling (tendinitis) and tears in your rotator cuff.


On your neck, cervical bone spurs can protrude inward, occasionally making it difficult to swallow or painful to breathe. Bone spurs can also push against veins, restricting blood flow to your brain.


Treatment of Bone Spurs


Treatment of the symptoms may include rest, ice, stretching, and no steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (Naiads) such as ibuprofen. If the bone spur is in the foot as in plantar fascistic, then esthetics, new footwear and extra padding in the show may help. If severe symptoms persist a physician may also suggest a corticosteroid injection reduce pain and inflammation of the soft tissues next to the bone spur.


Take an ice pack and apply it on the inflamed bone spur area 4-5 times in a day. If the problem doesn’t get cured, then apply heating pads.


Stand with the balls of your feet on the edge of a stair or curb and your heels over the edge. Relax your calf muscles and let your heels drop down slightly, until you feel the stretch along the Achilles tendons on the back of your heels.

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